Anglican Dictionary: N

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Narthex

In Greek, the word literally means “a large fennel” (a tall herb). In church architecture, the narthex is an enclosed space at the entry end of the nave of a building; the area in the church building inside the doors and in front of the nave. The narthex is usually enclosed (primarily to provide a buffer between the outside weather and the heating/cooling inside), and is the area where the procession gathers prior to the service.

Nave

The main part of a church building; the place where the congregation sits. Probably derived from the Latin word navis, meaning “ship.” (As in Noah’s ark) In medieval England the derogatory term “knave” (commoner) developed from nave, because the nave is the area of the building where the “common” people sit.

Nowell

From the French, Noel, “Christmas”. An old English name for Christmas, traditionally shouted or sung in joy, now chiefly used in The First Nowell Christmas carol.

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